History

Overview

The competition started in 2002 as a sub-project to Excitera, the student-driven entrepreneurship association at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), and was then called KTH Game Awards. Excitera Mobile Awards, a mobile application development competition, was started a year later which merged with SGA the year after.

Swedish Game Awards 2010 (2009-2010)

The competition continued with the platform independent awards: Game of the Year, Best Innovation and Best Execution. After a year of stabilizing the competition we decided to try a few new concepts.

The SGA Tour continued its success. The competition maintained a high number of finished games submitted yet again. The two online based mini-competitions; the Warmup Competition and the Concept Art Challenge broke new record in submitted, finished and high quality entries. This year SGA co-operated with NGA for the mini-challenges. Mother Vengeance, winner of our warm-up competition shows what great quality can be achieved by a small number of people in a very short time. We introduced a new challenge, the Game Pitch Challenge. It proved that there is a value in pitching your game and sharing ideas. We hope this will spawn a new online based pitching competition in the future. All in all, more people came to our events and played games than ever before. We kept the world class level of games and did it with a much lower financial support than previous years.

See the Swedish Game Awards 2010 website

Swedish Game Awards 2009 (2008-2009)

The competition continued with the platform independent awards: Game of the Year, Best Innovation and Best Execution. After many years of expansion the game awards team decided to use this year to stabilize the competition.

The SGA-Tour, where we visited 13 schools and reached out to well over 1000 students all over the country. The competition again broke new records in number of submitted entries and finished games. The two internet based mini competitions: the Warmup Competition and the Concept Art Challenge was again a great success featuring great innovative games as Gravitrex winner of our warm up competition. All in all, the contest was bigger than ever and the quality of the games reached a new high.

See the Swedish Game Awards 2008 website

Swedish Game Awards 2008 (2007-2008)

The 2008 competition used basically same formula as the year before, with great success. The biggest and most important change was made in the area of the competition. Where we previously handed out prizes in categories depending on target platform, we switched to three platform independent prizes: Game of the Year, Best Innovation and Best Execution.

The SGA-Tour, where we visited nine schools together with Avalanche Studios, reached out to over 1000 students all over the country. The website grew immensely, with over 850 unique users and two internet based mini competitions: the Warmup Competition and the Concept Art Challange. All in all, the contest was bigger than ever and the quality of the games reached a new high.

See the Swedish Game Awards 2008 website

Swedish Game Awards 2007 (2006-2007)

In 2007, the competition grew immensely in all directions. The SGA-Tour expanded internationally, with the competition being represented both at the Game Developers Conference and MIT 100k Global Startup Workshop, where it attracted large crowds and appeared in several newspapers.

Two new events were introduced, Gamers’ Challenge and Game Developers’ Workshop. Gamers’ Challenge was the kick-off event which allowed visitors to play the games that won the previous Swedish Game Awards.

The Grand Finale moved to Kulturhuset in central Stockholm. Swedish television personality Orvar Säfström hosted the award ceremony and at the end the jury took the stage and congratulated all the teams, handing out three extra honor nominations.

Swedish Game Awards 2006 (2005-2006)

2006 continued the success story from previous years. The total prize money was a record breaking 80 000 Swedish kronor. In total there were 52 registered teams for the PC class, that ended up turning in a total of 23 finished demos. In the mobile category there were 19 teams, of which 13 handed in working demos.

In cooperation with the partners there were three Game Developer’s Evenings at KTH. Together these events had over 300 visitors. The finale, held in May at KTH, drew over 400 visitors that watched the awards, mingled with partners in their booths and tried the entries out.

Swedish Game Awards 2005 (2004-2005)

In the fall of 2004 KTH Game Awards and Excitera Mobile Awards were merged to form Swedish Game Awards, Sweden’s largest game development competition for both PC and mobile. The competition gained a more national focus and participating teams came from the whole country to compete for the 45 000 Swedish kronor prize money. Swedish Game Awards arranged the SGA-Tour for the first time in the spring of 2005.

In total there were 64 registered teams (40 PC, 24 mobile), of which 57 (37 PC, 20 mobile) submitted the design documents and 35 (24 PC, 11 mobile) working game demos. The winner was CrazyBall (now renamed Switchball), with Noledo as runner-up. Promqueen took home the Best Game Idea prize.

In cooperation with our partners we arranged three Game Developers’ Evenings and a Developers’ Debate at KTH. Together these events attracted over 500 visitors. The finale was held in May at KTH and drew 400 visitors that watched the prize ceremony, mingled with partners in their booths and played the competition entries.

Excitera Mobile Awards 2004 (2003-2004)

The first run of EMA was held in 2004 and became a success with over 40 registered entries in 3 categories. Development was purely for the J2ME-platform.

KTH Game Awards 2004 (2003-2004)

In the unavoidable sequel to the first competition, the entries once again held a very high quality. Partners this time were DICE, QPAD and the gaming magazine Player1. The finale was covered by among others SVT’s Rapport, the national TV channel. The winner was Saga of Ina, a platform game that according to the jury had “convincing mood and graphics”. Runners up was Velocitors, a racing game with impressing graphics and physics model. The price for Best Game Idea was War, Siege & Conquest, a massively multiplayer game with a different and innovative design.

KTH Game Awards 2003 (2002-2003)

With support from game companies such as Microsoft and Digital Illusions (DICE) as well as a large interest from students and media, such as the daily newspaper Aftonbladet, a lot of high quality entries were submitted. Among the jury were representatives from successful companies in the industry. The winners in the contest, Xazzon, went on to participate in the worlds biggest computer games festival; Independent Game Festival in San José, California.

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